Bloomberg Businessweek

Another Dispute Over The Sept. 11 Lawsuit Bill

Legal experts say it’s already too weak to help plaintiffs much | “All the law does is clarify existing U.S. law, nothing more”
A protest outside the White House in support of allowing Sept. 11 families to sue Saudi Arabia, Sept. 20, 2016

For 14 years families of Sept. 11 victims have tried unsuccessfully to use the courts to pin responsibility for the terrorist attacks on Saudi Arabia. Legal obstacles have blocked those efforts, but on Sept. 28, Congress passed legislation—overriding a veto by President Obama—advertised as clearing the families’ path. “We rejoice in this triumph and look forward to our day in court,” declared Terry Strada, whose husband, Tom, died at the World Trade Center and who heads 9/11 Families & Survivors United for Justice Against Terrorism.

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