The Atlantic

Will America's Nuclear Weapons Always Be Safe From Hackers?

The future arsenal will be networked, presenting unique security challenges for the U.S. Air Force.
Source: Reuters

Future nuclear missiles may be siloed but, unlike their predecessors, they’ll exhibit “some level of connectivity to the rest of the warfighting system,” according to Werner J.A. Dahm, the chair of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. That opens up new potential for nuclear mishaps that, until now, have never been a part of Pentagon planning. In 2017, the board will undertake a study to see how to meet those concerns. “Obviously the Air Force doesn’t conceptualize systems like that without ideas for how they would address those surety concerns,” said Dahm.

It’s no simple or straight-forward undertaking. The last time

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic7 min readSociety
Are Politics Regressing to Premodern Forms?
The sultan’s hand felt soft and gentle, more suited for a moisturizer commercial than for participating in a public stoning. By the official count, the sultan of Brunei had shaken tens of thousands of hands in the previous two days, and I worried tha
The Atlantic4 min read
Narlugas Are Real
In the late 1980s, an Inuit subsistence hunter named Jens Larsen killed a trio of very strange whales off the western coast of Greenland. He and his fellow subsistence hunters would regularly catch two species: narwhals, whose males famously have lon
The Atlantic6 min readSociety
The Children America Throws Away
A young gun-rights activist is entitled to mercy and understanding. But so are the millions of other children who never get it.