The Atlantic

Kids Aren't Interested in Moral Conflict

Adults admire people who overcome temptation, but children judge them for feeling tempted in the first place.
Source: Michaela Rehle / Reuters

When was the last time you were tempted, even briefly, to do something a little immoral? To lie, betray a friend’s confidence, cut in line, or take a little more than your share? I’m willing to bet it was today. Maybe in the past hour. Larger temptations hound us too, especially those involving sex or money. And yet, perhaps to a shocking extent, we often rise above these temptations and act morally nonetheless. But how does the inner struggle with temptation affect how our actions are viewed by others? Who is the better person: the one who acts

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