Nautilus

David Deutsch Explains Why It’s Good To Be Wrong

Making a mistake on a science exam is bad. So is publishing a paper with flawed reasoning. But what about being fallible in the first place? That, says David Deutsch, should be embraced.

Deutsch is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a pioneer in quantum computing, and a popular science book author. He is also a dyed-in-the-wool optimist. Why does he think the future looks so bright? Because of our ability to think rationally, and to be wrong. After all, he

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