The Atlantic

A Dark Time in Denmark's History

An Oscar-nominated film explores possible war crimes in the country after World War II.
Source: Nordisk Film

Had the Allies landed on the Western coast of Denmark on D-Day, the Nazis would have been ready. The German forces had built up the defensive Atlantic Wall, which stretched along the European coast from the top of Norway to south of France, to protect against an invasion launched from Britain. With Denmark offering a short route to Berlin, an invasion there seemed likely, and the Axis power prepared by planting between one and two million landmines along the Nazi-occupied nation’s shores.

Invaded by German forces in April 1940, Denmark was spared harsh treatment during most of its occupation. For

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