NPR

Norwegian Pension Fund Divests From Companies Behind DAPL

KLP is pulling millions of dollars it has invested in companies building and owning the Dakota Access Pipeline. The decision was reportedly driven by pressure from Norway's indigenous Sami peoples.

A Norwegian fund that manages government employees' pensions has decided to remove its investments from the companies behind the Dakota Access Pipeline, a move that was reportedly inspired by pressure from Norway's indigenous Sami peoples.

The pipeline is being built by Energy Transfer Partners, or ETP. Allowing the pipeline to cross of the Missouri River

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