NPR

South Korea Tries To Raise Sewol Ferry Nearly 3 Years After Deadly Sinking

More than 300 people perished in the disaster, mostly high school students on a field trip. Investigators hope to better understand why the ship sank once the Sewol is raised and put in dry dock.
JINDO-GUN, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 23: Submersible vessel attempts to salvage sunken Sewol ferry in waters off Jindo, on March 23, 2017 in Jindo-gun, South Korea. The Sewol sank off the Jindo Island in April 2014 leaving more than 300 people dead and nine of them still remain missing. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

Almost three years ago, the ferry Sewol sank in rough seas off South Korea. More than 300 people perished, mostly high school students on a field trip.

Now, South Korea's government is trying to raise what's left of the 6,800-ton ship. As NPR's Elise Hu reports from Seoul

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