NPR

Child Deaths Drop From 14.2 Million In 1990 To 7.3 Million In 2015

That's the encouraging news in a new report. But it also means more kids are living long enough to face a host of serious challenges to their physical and mental health.
A girl carries a child in the outskirts of Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi. That's one of the countries in sub-Saharan Africa that has made good progress in reducing child mortality. Source: Aris Messinis

The world is doing a much better job of keeping babies alive long enough to become children, children alive long enough to become teens and teens alive long enough to fully grow up, according to a report in today's JAMA Pediatrics. "I think that the overall highlight of the report is good news," says Dr. Nicholas J. Kassebaum, an author of the report by members of the Global Burden of Disease Child and Adolescent Health Collaboration. "Without exception child mortality has improved throughout the world for the last 25 years."

But it's not all good news. The children in poor countries who might have died as babies

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