Inc.

Forget Stock Price

Look closely to find the real marks of post-IPO success

IT’S A FAMILIAR TALE: A hot startup announces plans to go public. Demand is brisk, the company makes a strong market debut, and its stock price and investors’ expectations climb. And then, in the following months or years, comes the bad news: quarterly losses, lack of growth, layoffs, and a tumbling stock price.

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