NPR

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

Research in epilepsy has found a key to why small pulses of electricity to the brain sometimes help and sometimes hurt a failing memory. Brains hurt by physical trauma or dementia might benefit, too.
Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Source: Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO

People with a brain injury or dementia often struggle to remember simple things, like names or places. In research published Thursday in the journal Current Biology, scientists have shown it may be possible to improve this sort of memory using tiny pulses of electricity — if they're properly timed.

A typical person's ability to remember things tends to vary a lot, says Michael Kahana, who directs the

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