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Science Isn't Partisan, But Public Perception Of Science Often Is

A new study finds that science is assimilated within a web of existing attitudes and beliefs, a core part of which concerns a person's social identity, says Tania Lombrozo.

Last Saturday, tens of thousands of people across the country joined the March for Science, an event that the official website described as "the first step of a global movement to defend the vital role science plays in our health, safety, economies, and governments."

It's no secret that the event was largely prompted by Donald Trump's actions and proposed policies, many of which threaten efforts to curtail climate change and ignore the value of scientific research and evidence-based policy. But advocates for the march were generally careful to separate science from partisan politics. As one

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