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S. African Program Breaks Link Between Violence and HIV

A woman who was diagnosed with the HIV virus has her heart rate checked during a consult with a nurse at Ubuntu Clinic on June 3, 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa. She is a member of a support group, called an adherence club, for stable patients.
05_05_SugarDaddies_01 Source: Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor/Getty

Miranda was four months pregnant and extremely anxious when she got her first HIV test. She had long been afraid of a positive diagnosis, and shortly after stepping into a tent offering free HIV tests at a taxi stand in central Johannesburg, her fear was confirmed.

Miranda—who asked to use a pseudonym to protect her safety and privacy—had never been tested. “[I thought], It’s not going to happen to me.… [But] part of me knew it was true. I wasn’t handling it very well.” Nor was her partner. “He would tell me that I was the one who brought [HIV] into our house and get physical with me.”

After her diagnosis, Miranda was referred to Safe and Sound

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