NPR

Under Trump Budget, Nearly 2 Million Kids May Lose After-School Care

The Trump administration says there's no evidence the program works, but supporters say that thinking is misguided. Some even call it a "godsend."
Anna Marie McClanahan (center) helps children write stories by using Legos to create scenes. Source: Pam Fessler

Mary Beth Burkes lives in Buchanan County, Va., a depressed coal-mining region where 1 in 4 families lives in poverty and where her autistic son gets extra help in the after-school program at his school.

Burkes says the program has been a godsend for her and other parents, because they know their children are in a safe place after school. "Their parents work," she says. "There is no day care in this area."

But in his budget for next year

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