The Atlantic

The Broken Promise of Higher Education

Americans believe self-interested leaders have put their needs ahead of students, leading to a college-completion crisis.
Source: Patrick Fallon / Reuters

May is always an important month in the college calendar. Many high-school seniors across the nation make the decision where to attend college; millions of college students graduate and enter the workforce.

It is the circle of life for colleges and universities in the United States—young students deciding what courses to take and what to major in, accumulating credits and knowledge, and, upon graduation, taking that experience into the workforce. Having been a professor and dean for many years, I have looked across the sea of

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