The Atlantic

Graduation and Gentrification: This Week's Top 7 Education Stories

The best recent writing about school
Source: Patrick Fallon / Reuters

An Inside Look at America’s Higher-Education Frontier

Sam Contis, Eric Benson | The California Sunday Magazine

It’s easy to see Deep Springs College—a tiny, highly selective two-year liberal-arts institution just outside Death Valley—as a bastion of tradition. The school was founded in 1917 by the electricity tycoon L.L. Nunn to create service-oriented leaders, and in many ways it can seem like a finishing school for intellectual cowboys. The 25 or so students are all male. They spend their days engaging in both manual labor (the college is a working cattle ranch) and classroom discourse (syllabi skew toward

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