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All Over The World, Thirsty Muslims Have Their Ramadan Go-To Drinks

After a long day of fasting, especially in summer, thirst can be stronger than hunger. The drinks of choice are usually sweet and fruity, but each country puts its own spin on a refreshing beverage.
Favorite Ramadan drinks vary by country. In Jordan and Lebanon, tamer hindi, a tamarind-based beverage (seen above), is often offered alongside qamar al-deen, a thick apricot nectar. Source: Amy E. Robertson for NPR

During Ramadan, refraining from even a bite to eat is a challenge, but what about a month of daylight hours without anything to drink?

"After a long day — especially in summer — of fasting, one becomes more thirsty than hungry," says food blogger Amira Ibrahim. "So when it is time to break your fasting day, everybody rushes to the drinks."

"The basis for [fasting from] drinking and food is the same," explains Imam Adeel Zeb, interfaith scholar and Muslim

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