NPR

A Good News Story About Diarrhea — With One Surprising Exception

A new report points to great progress in reducing deaths from diarrheal diseases. But as the low-income world sees progress, rates are inching up in wealthy countries, including the U.S.
Source: Leanne Abraham

Diarrhea is not only a topic that makes people a bit squeamish, it turns out to be a difficult disease to put into numbers.

But two trends are clear, says an author of a new report: The number of deaths from diarrheal diseases is dropping dramatically in low-income countries – and ticking upward in wealthy nations.

An infection by E. coli, Cryptosporidium, Shigella or rotavirus, and the resulting diarrhea, is often a death sentence in much of the world. In 2005, about 1.6 million people died from diarrhea-related

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