Fortune

FIGHTING DIABETES WITH FOOD

Trulia cofounder Sami Inkinen has launched a service to take on the epidemic without using medications. Can it succeed where others have failed?
Inkinen in 2012, around the time he diagnosed himself as prediabetic.

IN THE SUMMER OF 2012, Sami Inkinen was 36, wealthy, and semiretired. Trulia, the online real estate company he cofounded and nurtured from a startup to a business with some 20 million users, had filed to go public, and he had decided to cease his operational role. The eight-year journey had been rewarding but exhausting. Inkinen planned to focus on angel investing.

That would leave plenty of time for his main hobby: triathlons. A champion who obsessively tracks his biometrics, Inkinen was a fitness freak even by Silicon Valley standards. He had less than 8% body fat.

But life is full of ironic twists, and he was hurtling toward a particularly sharp one. Soon after

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