NPR

Mom Of Cross-Border Shooting Victim 'Still Waiting For Victory'

Because Sergio Hernandez was standing outside of U.S. territory when he was shot to death, a lawsuit had been impossible — until the Supreme Court weighed in Monday.
Maria Guereca in her apartment in Juarez, Mexico, holding a picture of her son, Sergio Hernandez the day the Supreme Court news came down. He was killed by a Border Patrol agent seven years ago this month. Source: John Burnett

Two-thousand miles away from the Supreme Court's vaulted ceiling and marble friezes, 60-year-old jobless mother Maria Guereca sat in her $20-a-month, one-room apartment with a fan and a hotplate — beside a picture of her dead son.

On Monday, the Court gave Guereca, who lives in Juarez, Mexico, a partial victory, saying a lower court erred in granting immunity to an agent who shot and killed her son.

As the Trump administration plans to ramp up security on the border, the case is

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