NPR

Is A No-Meat World Really Better?

It is clear that less meat is good morally and environmentally, but no meat may not be as good as some may think, says blogger Marcelo Gleiser.
Source: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Let's face it: Vegetarians are a strict minority of the U.S. population.

The numbers seem to be increasing, though data from various surveys vary widely.

For example, a Public Policy Polling survey of 500 respondents indicates a jump in non-meat-eaters from one percent in 1971 to a whopping 13 percent in 2013 — 6 percent vegans, 7 percent vegetarians. (Somewhat tragicomically, the question about vegetarianism is part of a poll titled: "Americans pick Ronald McDonald over Burger King for President.") Other sources show results which, if you are rooting for vegetarianism, are much worse. A 2006 study endorsed by the Food and Drug Administration concludes that 2.3 percent of U.S. adults are vegetarians and 1.4 percent are vegans. A more recent 2016 Harris poll commissioned by the Vegetarian Resource Group puts the

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR3 min readPolitics
He Led A Platoon Of Artists Who Fooled The Germans: 'Imagination Is Unbelievable'
At 104 years old, Gilbert Seltzer remembers his time in a secret Army unit in World War II, helping deceive the enemy with rubber artillery and the recorded sounds of rumbling tanks.
NPR3 min readScience
South Africa's Carbon Tax Set To Go Into Effect Next Week
President Cyril Ramaphosa signed the measure into law on Sunday. Some 40 countries have adopted various programs aimed at changing the price of carbon.
NPR2 min readScience
Likely Tornado Kills At Least 2 In Oklahoma
The storm struck the city of El Reno late Saturday night, causing severe damage to a motel and mobile home park.