NPR

Study: Holding Kids Back A Grade Doesn't Necessarily Hold Them Back

Grade retention has mixed results for school performance, a large study of students in Florida shows.
Source: Chelsea Beck

Our education system has this funny quirk of grouping kids by birth date — rather than, say, intellectual ability or achievement or interest.

But developmental pathways are as individual as kids themselves.

And so there's a perpetual back-and-forth about whether to put certain kids in school a grade behind or ahead of their actual age.

Recently we covered the research on "redshirting," or

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