NPR

For South Korea's LGBT Community, An Uphill Battle For Rights

This month's pride celebration in Seoul drew more people than ever. But protesters also showed up in force. Christian activists insist the socially conservative country won't accept sexual minorities.
LGBT pride celebrations took place in mid-July in Seoul. "In comparison to other [pride celebrations] in the world, there's more protest out here," says actor Lee Sang-hoon (far right, in pink). "But it makes me want to fight against them and it makes me want to win." Source: Seung-il Ryu

South Korea is one of the world's richest nations, a modern place with trends changing as fast as its Internet speeds. But when it comes to some social issues, the country has been slow to change — especially for gays and lesbians.

While there are shows of support — this month, a record 85,000 people turned up at Seoul's annual pride festival, for example — recent events indicate South Korea's institutions and political class are only reluctantly tolerating

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