NPR

Scientists Aim For Better, Cheaper Tests For Alzheimer's

The goal is to find accurate, painless tests that can help doctors diagnose Alzheimer's early and track the progression of the illness and any response to treatment. A few tests seem promising.
Finding some change in the blood of an Alzheimer's patient that accurately reflects the damaging changes in the brain has been tough. Source: utah778//iStockphoto/Getty Images

Efforts to develop a treatment that stalls the memory-robbing devastation of Alzheimer's disease have so far been unsuccessful, but scientists are making strides in another important area: the development of better tests to tell who has the condition.

Their aim is to develop more accurate, cheaper, and less invasive tests to detect the biological markers of Alzheimer's-induced changes in the brain.

At the recent Alzheimer's Association International Conference , scientists presented early but promising data on a new blood test and a novel brain imaging technique. They also unveiled preliminary data on a study to investigate the potential

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