The Atlantic

The Lost History of an American Coup D’État

Republicans and Democrats in North Carolina are locked in a battle over which party inherits the shame of Jim Crow.
Source: Library of Congress

By the time the fire started, Alexander Manly had vanished. That didn’t stop the mob of 400 people who’d reached his newsroom from making good on their promise. The crowd, led by a former congressman, had given the editor-in-chief an ultimatum: Destroy your newspaper and leave town forever, or we will wreck it for you.

They burned The Daily Record to the ground.

It was the morning of November 10, 1898, in Wilmington, North Carolina, and the fire was the beginning of an assault that took place seven blocks east of the Cape Fear River, about 10 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. By sundown, Manly’s newspaper had been torched, as many as 60 people had been murdered, and the local government that was elected two days prior had been overthrown and replaced by white supremacists.

For all the violent moments in United States history, the mob’s gruesome attack was unique: It was the only coup d’état ever to take place on American soil.

What happened that day was nearly lost to history. For decades, the perpetrators were cast as heroes in American history textbooks. The black victims were is a nondescript church parking lot—an ordinary-looking square of matted grass on a tree-lined street in historic Wilmington. The , a successor of sorts to the old , stands in a white clapboard house across the street. But there’s no evidence of what happened there in 1898.

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