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Total Eclipse Of The Stomach: A Stellar Menu Of Gastronomic Delights

What can you do when the Earth plunges into total darkness on Aug. 21? Eat, of course! And there are many space-themed treats to keep the skywatching party going.
The Eclipse Magic Cone features a black waffle cone made with coconut ash and tipped with edible gold, and an interior filled with spiced marshmallow fluff and a golden-yellow ice cream flavored with ginger and turmeric. Source: Courtesy of Salt & Straw

Brace yourselves, North America — we're about to get mooned. Or, more accurately, eclipsed.

The Aug. 21 solar eclipse is offering a welcome respite from the dog days of summer and a pretty good reason to take an extended lunch hour for some — or maybe even a whole vacation day. And for those who fear that a total eclipse heralds doomsday, then perhaps it's just as well to eat, drink and be merry.

With the — the roughly 70-mile-wide strip across the lower 48 that will experience a complete eclipse — stretching from Lincoln Beach, Ore., to Charleston, S.C., the rest of North America (and some parts of South America, Africa and Europe) will be treated to at. While the peak of the eclipse will generally last just a minute or two, the path of the moon moving across the sun will take about

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