NPR

Wreckage Of USS Indianapolis, Sunk By Japanese In WWII, Found In Pacific

The cruiser was returning from a secret mission to deliver atomic bomb components when she was sunk by a Japanese submarine. The ensuing loss of life is the large in the history of the U.S. Navy.

For 72 years since the cruiser USS Indianapolis sank after being struck by Japanese torpedoes in the waning days of World War II, her exact resting place had been a mystery.

But a team of researchers led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen now says they have positively identified the wreckage, 18,000 feet below the surface

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