NPR

Fraternity Members' Defamation Case Against 'Rolling Stone' Can Proceed, Court Says

A U.S. appeals court says three members of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity have a plausible case that they were implicated in a now-retracted story about an alleged gang rape at U.Va.
The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house is seen on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., in 2014. Three graduates of U.Va. have won the right to sue Rolling Stone magazine for defamation over a now-retracted article alleging that fraternity members perpetrated a horrific gang rape. / Jay Paul / Getty Images

Rolling Stone magazine is facing a defamation suit — again — as a federal appeals court ruled that three former University of Virginia students have a plausible case that they were personally implicated in a now-retracted story about an alleged gang rape.

The lawsuit began but was dismissed by a district court. Now the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

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