Popular Science

Evaporating lakes could help power the country

Scientists develop new ways to harness energy from evaporation.
water

Don't let that energy vanish into thin air

Pixabay

When conversation turns to sources of clean renewable energy, evaporation usually isn’t the first thing to come up—if it even comes up at all.

Yet scientists think evaporation from U.S. lakes and reservoirs could generate almost 70 percent of the power the nation produces now. Even better, it could meet demand both day and night, solving the intermittency problems posed by solar and wind.

“Evaporation occurs day and night, all year round,” said Ahmet-Hamdi Cavusoglu, a graduate student at Columbia University and lead author of a published in the journal that calculated the possible future impact of evaporation as a

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