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Three win Nobel Prize in chemistry for finding a way to peer deep into the molecules of life

The winners developed cryo-electron microscopy, a tool that allows scientists to generate a three-dimensional image of a protein down to the atomic level.

Three researchers who developed a way to see the basic molecules of life in three dimensions won the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced on Wednesday.

Jacques Dubochet of Switzerland’s University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank of Columbia University in New York City, and Richard Henderson of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in England were honored “for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution,” said Göran Hansson,

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