NPR

Trump Puts Iran Nuclear Deal In Limbo, Calling Agreement 'Unacceptable'

"We will not continue down a path whose predictable conclusion is more violence, more terror and the very real threat of Iran's nuclear breakout," President Trump said on F
President Trump speaks to the media before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on Oct. 7. / Pool / Getty Images

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

President Trump is striking a formal blow against the Iran nuclear deal. But he is stopping short of asking Congress to re-impose sanctions on Tehran. Instead, the president is urging lawmakers to pass a new law, spelling out conditions under which sanctions could be re-imposed.

In a speech from the Diplomatic Room at the White House, Trump said he is directing his administration "to work closely with Congress and our allies to address the deal's many serious flaws so that the Iranian regime can never threaten the world with nuclear weapons."

If that approach does not work, the president said, "then the agreement will be terminated." He noted that U.S. participation in the deal "can be canceled by me as president at any time."

While Trump has long criticized the nuclear deal as "," he has twice before reluctantly certified

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR2 min read
Supreme Court Strikes Down Ban On Trademarking 'Immoral,' 'Scandalous' Words, Symbols
The decision paves the way for a clothing line, FUCT, to get its trademark. But the justices were split on how far is too far and which words they would find to be the most vulgar and profane.
NPR6 min readPolitics
U.S. Mideast Plan Rejected By Palestinian Leaders, Panned By Former U.S. Envoys
The White House unveiled its economic peace proposal for Palestinians on Saturday: $50 billion for Palestinians and countries in the region. It isn't clear who would contribute the funding.
NPR2 min read
Supreme Court Orders Documents Unsealed In Death Penalty Case
The blacked-out material involves the drugs used in an Alabama execution. The release of the material was ordered after a motion filed by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and NPR.