Popular Science

There’s apparently a giant void in the Great Pyramid. Here’s why we don’t know what’s in there.

The space was recently discovered using particle physics, and cosmic rays.
scan pyramid with void

An illustration showing the approximate position of the void in the pyramid.

canPyramids mission

In the upper reaches of Earth’s atmosphere, a rain of high-energy radiation slams into the thin air. The impact creates a second shower of charged subatomic particles, like , which fall towards Earth, and then fall into it. They drift down through and then through stone, with most halting in the sculpted, lithified skeletons of long-dead sea creatures. Others press.

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