The Atlantic

Women in Tech Are Rising Higher in China Than in the U.S.

About half of American technology companies have women in top positions. In China, it’s closer to 80 percent.
Source: Mike Blake / Reuters

I spent much of the summer of 2015 covering the absolute unraveling of Uber China, a multibillion-dollar effort that failed spectacularly. When Uber ultimately admitted defeat in 2016, Shonda Rhimes couldn’t have scripted the narrative better.

Uber had devastated competitors in each market, and its Chinese competitor Didi Chuxing turned Uber’s game on itself. Didi was the only ride-sharing company in the world whose resources rivaled Uber’s, backed by two of the largest Chinese internet companies and several of the largest hedge funds in the world. And while there was never any evidence of the Chinese government making life any worse for the American company in the market, Didi obviously had the home-field advantage when it came to working politics in China, if it came down to that.

And China was already the largest ride-sharing market in the world by rides.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic4 min read
The Necessity of Toni Morrison
One of my white teachers in high school insisted that Toni Morrison would be confusing to me as a reader. So I approached the author’s work with that notion in mind, and quickly realized how wrong my teacher’s assessments were. Morrison’s prose was l
The Atlantic5 min readPolitics
Trump and Kim’s Interactions Aren’t Transactional Anymore
Negotiations between Washington and Pyongyang entail the good, the bad, and the ugly of any relationship.
The Atlantic3 min readPolitics
What Sets Bernie Sanders’s Student-Debt Plan Apart
The senator, alongside Representatives Ilhan Omar and Pramila Jayapal, announced legislation to cancel all student-loan debt and make college debt-free.