The Guardian

Drug traffickers taught the rich how to hide money in tax havens | Roberto Saviano

Legal capitalism has learned from criminal capitalism that in the world of money, only rule breakers survive, writes mafia expert Roberto Saviano
HAMILTON, BERMUDA - NOVEMBER 8: A view of Hamilton Harbour at dusk, November 8, 2017 in Hamilton, Bermuda. In a series of leaks made public by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, the Paradise Papers shed light on the trillions of dollars that move through offshore tax havens. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

It was only 19 months ago that the Panama Papers were released. Now, it’s the Paradise Papers that are filling the front pages of English and European newspapers. Back when the Panama Papers were released, I wrote that if David Cameron’s name hadn’t been in those documents, the news probably wouldn’t have had the same impact. Today I think that if Queen Elizabeth’s name hadn’t come up, we likely wouldn’t be discussing it either.

The mechanisms are the same.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Guardian

The Guardian2 min readSociety
Up To Four Avocado Trucks Stolen In Mexican State Every Day
Packers and exporters took out newspaper adverts to decry situation in Michoacán, a battleground for warring crime factions
The Guardian2 min read
Kim Jong-nam, Half-brother Of North Korean Leader, 'Was A CIA Informant'
Kim Jong-nam, the half-brother of the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, was a CIA informant before he was assassinated in Malaysia in 2017, a report has claimed. Citing an unnamed “person knowledgeable about the matter”, the Wall Street Journal said
The Guardian5 min readPolitics
Leaked Documents Reveal Russian Effort To Exert Influence In Africa
Exclusive: Kremlin ally Yevgeny Prigozhin leading push to turn continent into strategic hub, documents show