NPR

Poll: Asian-Americans See Individuals' Prejudice As Big Discrimination Problem

In an NPR poll looking at experience with discrimination, Asian-Americans told us that individual prejudice is a bigger problem than bias by government or laws.
Source: Alyson Hurt

New results from an NPR survey show that large numbers of Asian-Americans experience and perceive discrimination in many areas of their daily lives. This happens despite their having average incomes that outpace other racial, ethnic and identity groups.

The poll, a collaboration among NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, also finds a wide gap between immigrant and nonimmigrant Asian-Americans in reporting discrimination experiences, including violence and harassment.

"Our poll shows that, professor of health policy and political analysis at the Harvard Chan School who co-directed the survey. "Over the course of our series, we are seeing again and again that income is not a shield from discrimination."

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