Popular Science

What to buy the most boring people you know

Even dullards deserve some holiday cheer.

Christmas gift

Wrap them in some shiny paper and these presents will seem more festive and less practical.

Pexels user Tookapic

You know the person. He thinks that brightly colored dress socks are a dangerously bold statement. She thinks that lacy underwear is only for special occasions. Some people would call them boring, but they’d just say they’re practical. They don’t want concert tickets or frivolous merchandise this holiday season, so give them what they really want: something useful. Note: this story was originally published in 2016, but has been updated to include the best products of this year.

Star Wars socks

Star Wars socks

Sock it to me

Amazon

For your brother who gets excited by wearing trilogy is. Better yet, get them for your sister in honor of the premiere to celebrate bad-ass women as leading characters. This site doesn’t sell Star Wars socks for women, but socks don’t need a gender anyway—so just go ahead and buy a smaller version for all the ladies in your life.

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