Los Angeles Times

For a deported man and his family, an uneasy 'homecoming' in Mexico

MALINALCO, Mexico - As the cell door slammed behind him at an immigrant detention center in Detroit, Jose Roberto Tetatzin knew his life as an American was about to come to an abrupt end.

He thought about all the things he had acquired over 10 years of hard work in Michigan: the apartment full of furniture, the cool clothes, the cars.

And he thought about his daughters, 7-year-old Angela and newborn Lesli, both U.S. citizens who until that morning had such bright futures ahead of them.

Tetatzin knew he was going to be deported to his native Mexico. Now he and his partner, Judith Cristal Gudino, would have to decide what to do next.

Should the girls stay in the U.S. with Gudino, or should the whole family relocate to Mexico?

At night, he talked through the dilemma with other detained immigrant fathers in the same situation, men from Central America, Africa, even the Middle East. Sometimes, they cried together.

When Tetatzin was finally deported in 2015 in connection with a drunken driving conviction two years earlier, he was part of a large wave of Mexicans returning home.

More Mexicans have left the U.S. than have migrated to it in recent years, data show, a reversal of the largest flow of incoming migrants in modern U.S. history and a significant new chapter in the immigration narrative that has long dominated U.S. politics and culture.

Some have returned to reconnect with family or take advantage of new opportunities in

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