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Ursula K. Le Guin's Voice Rings Out In New Nonfiction Collection

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Ursula K. Le Guin's mastery of fiction has remained so consistent throughout her decades-long career, it's easy to overlook her accomplishments in other forms. Sure, she's the author of iconic, award-winning science fiction novels such as 1969's and 1971's , not to mention the beloved fantasy series , which began in 1968. But those distinct works share Le Guin's firm grasp of poetic language, science, and history. Accordingly, she's a brilliant poet, albeit a less recognized one. Even further down on her résumé are her wins as a nonfiction writer. Her 2016 collection of essays and reviews, , won the Hugo Award for Best Related Work in 2017, despite the fact thatfrom 2004 and now, , a new book that assembles some of her most cogent ruminations on everything from gender politics to anthropology to, yes, science fiction and fantasy.

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