The Guardian

World's awkward silence over Rohingya genocide warnings

With no appetite for humanitarian intervention and no support for a powerful ICC, there is unlikely to be justice in Myanmar or elsewhere
Rohingya women, who fled from Myanmar, wait for aid to be distributed at a camp in Bangladesh. Photograph: Dar Yasin/AP

A stark warning from the UN in mid-December that genocide may be taking place in Myanmar has been met by an awkward silence around the world, indicating a limited appetite for forceful humanitarian intervention, even in the most extreme cases.

The persecution of the Rohingya Muslim minority is beginning to resemble the plight of the Tutsi in Rwanda in 1994, albeit on a smaller scale. After failing to stop the Rwanda slaughter, when up to 1 million people died, the international community vowed it would never happen again..

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