Popular Science

Why can't we decide what to do about nuclear energy?

Build them up? Or tear them down?

Within sight of the sunbathers at Old Man’s surf spot, 55 miles north of San ­Diego, California, loom a pair of 176-foot-tall orbs. They’re a strange backdrop, home of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. Since its first reactor fired up in 1968, the plant has powered millions of lives. But now these concrete and steel domes house a problem. Inside their frames sit millions of pounds of radio-active fuel no longer of use to anyone.

In 2012, a small leak forced the shutdown of one reactor. Rather than go through the regulatory red-tape of restarting the remaining reactor at reduced power, Southern California Edison, the operator, decided to shutter the whole plant. This year, workers will begin dismantling it as part of the costliest and biggest nuclear decommissioning project ever attempted in the U.S. The initial deactivation should take 10 years, with 700,000 metric tons of infrastructure crushed and freighted off to burial plots in Utah, ­Texas, and Arizona. The most-235—will be interred on-site in steel-and-concrete casks that will dot the landscape like tombstones.

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