Bloomberg Businessweek

Silence on Wall Street

Finance hasn’t had its #MeToo moment. Women say the culture of banking and a web of legal agreements keep harassment hidden

Three women who’ve had long careers in banking sat down for lunch together in Manhattan on the first Wednesday of the year. It didn’t take long before they asked one another the question: Why hasn’t the Harvey Weinstein effect hit finance?

After the movie mogul was accused last October of sexual harassment and assault, powerful men have been pushed out of jobs in the media, the arts, politics, academia, and the restaurant business because women spoke up to allege egregious behavior. Something is different on Wall Street. While the #MeToo movement spreads far and wide, these

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek2 min read
Slack Is Gossipy Email With Push Notifications
Like the open-plan office, Slack has become a controversial fixture of white-collar work. The company behind this workplace instant messaging software, Slack Technologies Inc., is preparing to make its stock available for the first time on exchanges
Bloomberg Businessweek6 min read
India Is Running Out of Time
The world’s largest democracy faces huge pressures from its expectant but underserved youth
Bloomberg Businessweek3 min read
Electric Cars Are Quiet. Too Quiet
By their nature, electric vehicles are quiet—and that’s a problem. If pedestrians, especially the visually impaired, can’t hear a car approaching, they don’t know to step out of its way. New federal safety regulations requiring all 2020 EV and hybrid