NPR

Helping Strangers May Help Teens' Self-Esteem

Adolescents are under more pressure than ever, and many suffer from depression and anxiety. But new research suggests that volunteering to help strangers makes them feel better about themselves.
When teens step out of their comfort zone to help people they don't know, they feel confident. Source: Hero Images

At the start of the new year, parents may encourage their teens to detox from social media, increase exercise, or begin a volunteer project. While kids may bristle at the thought of posting fewer selfies, surveys indicate 55 percent of adolescents enjoy volunteering. And according to a recent study, when it comes to helping others, teens may benefit psychologically from spending time helping strangers.

The study, published in December in the, suggests that altruistic behaviors, including large and small acts of kindness,

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