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One Of The World's Rarest Fish Is A Little Less Rare Than We Thought

The red handfish, named for hand-shaped fins on the sides of its body, doesn't really swim — it walks slowly along the sea floor. A new population of the striking creature has been found off Tasmania.
A new population of the rare Red Handfish was found off Tasmania. Source: Antonia Cooper

The known population of one of the world's rarest fish has just doubled, thanks to a lucky find in the waters off Tasmania, Australia.

Meet the red handfish, a name that reflects the hand-shaped fins on the sides of its body. The striking creature doesn't really swim — it "walks" slowly along the sea floor. And until

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