The Atlantic

Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan Are Going to Fix Health Care—Somehow

The ambition is thrilling. The details are scarce.
Source: Peter Macdiarmid / Getty

Amazon, JPMorgan Chase, and Berkshire Hathaway announced on Tuesday that they intend to form a new company that manages health care for their hundreds of thousands of U.S. employees, the idea being that a unified, not-for-profit entity can reduce workers’ expenses.

The surprising trio of the nation’s largest online retailer, largest bank by assets, and most famous investor (Warren Buffett, the chief executive of Berkshire) riding to the rescue of the beleaguered insurance stocks and health-care experts who have long dreamed of a technological solution to “bend the curve” of inexorably rising medical costs.

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