Los Angeles Times

A Lebanese director's new film opens old wounds

BEIRUT - In movie theaters in Lebanon, "The Insult" is preceded by a terse disclaimer: The views in the film do not represent those of the Lebanese government.

Yet that official unease didn't stop the Lebanese ministry of culture from choosing "The Insult" as the country's entry for this year's Academy Awards, and last month it was named one of the five finalists in the foreign language category.

The government's ambivalence speaks to both Lebanon's on-again, off-again love affair with the film's director, Ziad Doueiri, and the difficult relationship many Lebanese still have with the subject matter: the country's long civil war.

The conflict, not unlike the one now raging next door in Syria

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times2 min read
Commentary: Manufacturers Are Pushing Larger Gun Magazines. Expect Mass Shootings To Get Worse
As bad as the pace and scope of the nation's mass shootings have become, with death tallies sometimes counted in the dozens, chances are good that they are only going to get worse. And you can blame gun manufacturers and firearms enthusiasts who are
Los Angeles Times6 min readSociety
12 Million Pills And 700 Deaths: How A Few Pill Mills Helped Fan The US Opioid Inferno
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Soon after he took over as medical director of the Urgent Care & Surgery Center in eastern Tennessee in 2012, Dr. Marc Valley realized he was supervising illegal drug dealers in lab coats. Platoons of patients socialized in the par
Los Angeles Times6 min read
Those Toys Are Back In Town: Woody And Buzz Join Pals Old And New For A Fourth Movie, Dreamed Up By Two Generations Of Pixar Talent
In 1995, a 15-year-old aspiring cartoonist named Josh Cooley walked into a movie theater in his hometown of Livermore, Calif., bought a ticket to a much-buzzed-about new animated film called "Toy Story" and had his mind forever blown to infinity and