The Atlantic

A Pet Crayfish Can Clone Itself, and It's Spreading Around the World

“We’re being invaded by an army of clones.”
Source: Ranja Andriantsoa

No one knows exactly when the clones first appeared, but humans only became aware of them in the early 2000s.

It was a German aquarium owner who first brought it to scientists’ attention. In 1995, he had acquired a bag of “Texas crayfish” from an American pet trader, only to find his tank inexplicably filling up with the creatures. They were all, it turns out,

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