The Guardian

The poorly reported Aziz Ansari exposé was a missed opportunity | Jill Filipovic

We can – we must – wade into the messy, complicated nature of sex in a misogynist world. But this celebrity exposé doesn’t do the job well enough
(FILES) In this photo taken on January 7, 2018, Actor Aziz Ansari poses with the trophy for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy during the 75th Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, California. Actor and comedian Aziz Ansari has acknowledged a sexual encounter with an anonymous accuser but insisted it was 'completely consensual.' The accusations, published January 14, 2018 in online magazine Babe, were made by a 23-year-old photographer from Brooklyn, New York, named only as 'Grace.' / AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN / Getty Images

It was bound to happen. In the midst of women sharing stories of harassment and assault via the #MeToo movement, and a brewing backlash of hand-wringers wondering if women have perhaps gone too far, it was only a matter of time before a publication did us the disservice of publishing a sensational story of a badly behaved man who was nonetheless not a sexual assailant. The publication: Babe.net. The man: Aziz Ansari. The story: a coercive, dehumanizing sexual interaction.

It’s a shame. Not because these stories shouldn’t be told – if anything, we need to talk more about how pervasive power imbalances benefit men and make sex worse for women. But instead

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