The Atlantic

These Crickets Can’t Sing Anymore—But They’re Still Trying

The change represents one of the fastest examples of evolution on record.
Source: Will T. Schneider

It took several years for the crickets of Kauai to fall silent. When Marlene Zuk first visited the Hawaiian island in 1991, she heard the insects chirping away, loudly and repeatedly. But every time she went back, the chirping diminished. In 2001, she only heard a single male, apparently singing into the void.

The crickets had disappeared from sight, too. But when Zuk returned to Kauai in 2003, she started seeing them again, seemingly in greater numbers than

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