Popular Science

Star Trek, James Bond, and the trip from science fiction to science fact

Excerpt: The Edumacation Book

robotic hand and butterfly

Some technology inspired by science fiction is now part of our lives today.

The following is an excerpt adapted from The Edumacation Book: Amazing Cocktail-Party Science to Impress Your Friends by Andy McElfresh.

Here’s my misspent youth: I spent many, many hours in a camping hammock behind my parents’ house devouring the Science Fiction Hall of Fame series, everything by Arthur C. Clarke, many things by Robert Heinlein, the complete works of Philip K. Dick, and especially issues of the short-lived Galileo magazine. I also read Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine, which was a lot like Alfred Hitchcock’s Suspense Magazine, but with ray guns and the peculiar feature of having a different photo of Isaac Asimov in the upper left corner on each issue. One photo was of Asimov’s feet.

edumacation cover

The Edumacation Book: Amazing Cocktail-Party Science to Impress Your Friends by Andy McElfresh, forward by Kevin Smith is available on March 20, 2018.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Popular Science

Popular Science3 min read
Blow Flies Help Us Solve Murders—but Climate Change Is Forcing Them Out
A chrysomya megacephala, commonly known as a blow fly. Muhammad Mahdi Karim Climate change has spurred the spread of invasive insects that devour crops, destroy homes, and spread disease. Now, rising temperatures are driving cadaver-eating blow flies
Popular Science3 min readTech
Not All Twitter Bots Are Bad
All my friends are bots. Eleanor Cummins and her incredible screenshotting abilities Twitter is cracking down on bots. A fundamental part of the social media platform’s appeal, these automated accounts provide information—and comedy and artistry—in w
Popular Science4 min read
These Plants Bring All The Birds To Your Yard
Carolina chickadees depend on the availability of high-calorie, high-protein prey, such as caterpillars, for a healthy breeding season. Doug Tallamy, University of Delaware Like songbirds? Right, many people do. It’s a different story when it comes t