NPR

Parkland Shooting Suspect: A Story Of Red Flags, Ignored

Friends, family and neighbors were aware of the man now accused of killing 17 people. So were two sheriff's departments and the FBI. Despite all the warnings, nothing was done to intervene.
Alleged shooter Nikolas Cruz appears in court for a status hearing before Broward Circuit Judge Elizabeth Scherer earlier this month. He is facing 17 charges of premeditated murder in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Source: Mike Stocker/Pool

Friends, family and neighbors were worried about Nikolas Cruz. So were social workers, teachers and sheriff's deputies in two counties.

As classes at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School resumed two weeks after the shooting rampage that left 17 people dead, it is increasingly clear that Cruz, the alleged gunman, was deeply troubled.

The 19-year-old was the subject of dozens of 911 calls and at least two separate tips to the FBI. He also came to the attention of the Florida Department of Children and Families. Despite warning signs stretching back over a decade, no one intervened to stop the Valentine's Day shooting spree.

Many calls to the police

Cruz and his younger brother were adopted by Roger and Lynda Cruz. The family bought a sprawling house in the affluent Fort

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