The Atlantic

Theresa May Gives Putin a 48-Hour Deadline

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May used unusually strong terms to link Russia to the poisoning of a former spy on British soil, but left open the question of what happens next.
Source: Markus Schreiber / AP

Russian operations in the West—or rather, Russian operations in the West—are designed in part for deniability. From election meddling in the United States to mysterious poisonings in the United Kingdom, the Russian connection has been visible through hints, happenstance, digital trails, or clear motives, but always hard to prove. Which leaves Western governments in the position of deciding when, and how, to make public accusations.

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